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Timeline

I was born into a Bangladesh Army family in 1994, to a schoolteacher and an intelligence officer.
I spent my first years of life in Germany, and grew up in the pristine military cantonments of Dhaka.
At the age of 6, my mother left for America, with my sister and me.
I attended Minneapolis public schools, with a few years spent in Catholic academies.
I excelled in speech, debate, academic trivia, and theatrical performance.
I played American football, basketball, baseball, wrestling, boxing, and golf, with relative success.
I spent the summers with my father.
At 15, I began working for my city’s government and police department, and won a scholarship to tour Europe.
At 16, I abandoned high school to study philosophy in the mountains of Santa Fe.
I left that college and earned my Bachelors in History at the University of Minnesota at 19.
I made several feature films, starting while still in college. (Full filmography here.)
At 20, I formed a filmmaking collective and launched a successful digital design business.
At 22, after the disastrous election of Donald Trump, I put my film ambitions on hold and adapted my design business towards pro-democracy politics.
My first campaign was my own unsuccessful campaign for Mayor of Minneapolis, which resulted in instant demand for my political design services and a featuring role in the Bravo Network’s special series, “Welcome to Waverly.”
At 24, I led digital content for now-Representative Dean Phillips, in the most pivotal Congressional race in the 2018 Democratic recapture of the House of Representatives.
At 25, I led digital content for the Presidential campaign of Senator Amy Klobuchar.
At 26, I bought my mother a house.
I am currently leading digital content on several pro-democracy and civil society causes, including the passage of the For the People Act, the largest pro-democracy reform bill since the Civil Rights era.
Recently, I relocated to Santa Monica, California, and am reclaiming my passion for film, with an emphasis on acting.

Favorite Music

The Strokes
Isaiah Rashad
OutKast
Frank Ocean
Arctic Monkeys
Still Woozy
The Beths
Bad Bad Hats
Summer Walker
Rayana Jay
SiR
Drake
Freddie Gibbs
Kendrick Lamar
Johnny Cash
Benny Goodman

Favorite Films & Shows

Cool Hand Luke
Fantastic Mr. Fox
There Will Be Blood
Drive
Mud
It’s A Wonderful Life
Beast of the Southern Wild
Hunt for the Wilderpeople
Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
The Big Lebowski
Paddington
The Wire
It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia
The Office (US)
The Sopranos

Favorite Books

Kazantzakis’ Zorba the Greek
Durants’ The Story of Civilization
Epictetus’ Enchiridion
Rilke’s Letters to a Young Poet
Camus’ Resistance, Rebellion, and Death
Spinelli’s Maniac Magee
Hughes’ I Wonder As I Wander
Usborne Encyclopedia of World History
Borges’ Ficciones

Countries Visited 

Austria
Bahrain
Bangladesh
Canada
China, People’s Republic
Czech Republic
Germany
Hungary
Kuwait
Liechtenstein
Nepal
Qatar
Singapore
Slovakia
Switzerland
United States

Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Results

See an explanation for these terms on IDRLabs.com

Political Compass Test

See details on PoliticalCompass.org

Big Five

Measured on five major dimensions of personality: Openness, Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Neuroticism.

DISC Report

See an explanation for these terms here.

Myers–Briggs Type Indicator

ENTJ. Extraverted, Intuitive, Thinking, Judging.

Enneagram

Eight.

“Eights are defined by their desire to be powerful and to avoid any vulnerability. They present a confident, assertive, and decisive image to others. Eights can be argumentative and intimidating; it is important to them to stand up for what they believe in and to protect those who are weaker than themselves.

Deepest Fear: Eights fear being vulnerable and powerless more than anything, and cope with this fear by always being strong and in control.

Enneagram (cotd.)

Core Motivations: Eights are motivated by their desire to be independent and in control. They resist appearing or feeling weak and reject any authority that restricts them.

Learn more at Truity.com

Truity “Toxic Traits”

See an explanation for these terms on Truity.com

Truity “Love Languages”

See an explanation for these terms on Truity.com

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